Disgusting Smiths Crisps TV advertisement

If you want to judge a society you should observe what TV ads appeal to it. It will tell you a lot about the moral fibre of viewers.  Of course,  it may only tell you about the values of the marketing companies, but you have to concede that along the line,  after the ad men created the ad,  the manufacturers must have  approved  the commercial.  So both manufacturers and marketing had to agree on the ethics of the campaign.

In this case, I feel entitled to blame the manufacturers of Smiths Crisps who are originally an Australian company founded by a Mr Smith, but which is now owned by Pepsi.

The advertisement which has distressed me is the one which shows an elderly woman opening the door to a repairman who has come to fix her stairlift.  He enters and  places his open tool box on the floor.   She notices that he has a packet of Smiths Crisps in it.  This old lady wants some and when the repairman closes the tool box she steals a part of the stairlift.

When he sits down on the stairlift and turns it on to test it,  it shoots upstairs and ejects him out of the window.   She then chuckles to herself and steals the packet of Smiths Crisps.

The final scene of the commercial portrays the old crone cheerfully  munching on the crisps.

Is that funny or is that funny?

Wow!  What a distressing depiction of old age!  The worst aspect of this commercial is that it condones violence and theft.

Shame on Smiths,  shame on Pepsi,  shame on the marketers and shame on the TV channels who didn’t have the moral fibre to reject this tasteless ad.

Irritating women at supermarket checkouts

Here is a typical scene at a supermarket checkout. You are standing in line behind a few women. You have your credit card at the ready.  This is contrary to the behaviour of  other women in front of you who go through the checkout and then at the end of the process are taken by surprise…apparently.

It seems that the checkout person expects them to pay.

So now the farce begins. Most female shoppers fumble in the depth of their handbags. Out come the hair dryers, the make-up purse, the chocolates, the collection of tissues and all sorts of other personal items until at the very bottom of the abyss,  the wallet is found. Then it takes a few minutes till the credit card or cash is located.

This seems to be a female thing.  They go through the process of placing the shopping items on the counter and  it’s only when the cashier has finished totalling that they work out that they actually have to pay for their purchase.

Of course this lack of  preparation slows everybody else down.

Honestly,  I have no idea how their mind works.

Now men, on the other hand,  always,  and I mean always,  have their wallets or credit cards ready so as not to delay the other shoppers in the queue.

I invite you all to observe this weird phenomenon.

Which is why when I select a queue in a supermarket I always head for the one that has many men in it.

Amazon’s amazing service!

We in Australia have given up on good service. It’s something that existed in the dim past when department stores were competitive and efficient.  I remember when a store such as David Jones ( an Australian icon) which has been around for years used to phone me the day after I made a purchase to see if I was happy with the service.

That sort of  thing no longer occurs. Nowadays,  we are grateful if a salesperson turns up and asks if we need any help.

So it really bowled me over when I had a problem downloading a book onto my kindle and filled in a request for help. The response was immediate. No sooner had I asked for help that the question was posed  “Do you want us to phone you now or in five minutes?”  I replied  now and now it was.  Someone from Amazon phoned me straightaway and explained that I need to REFRESH my kindle from time to time. She proceeded to go through the refresh process with me and fixed the problem.

The lady on the phone even sent me an email with instructions on how to refresh my kindle in the future.

That’s what I call service, amazing service,  and all credit must be given to Jeff Bezos for making Amazon super efficient.

 

So many babies fleeing Syria. How come?

During World War II there were very few babies born in the war zone.  In fact, the war  population demographic is extremely small compared with the baby boom that followed.

The reason for this lower number of babies born is is obvious. First of all,  the potential fathers were away at war. The second reason is that nobody wanted to bring a child into the world during such a horrific time even when a man was around.

The third reason is that many women were starving either in the concentration camps or outside in desperate situations. The lack of food and stress made women infertile.

Which is why I wonder about the large number of babies born during the past four years in Syria. These are the babies who are being brought to Europe or drowning at sea.

If the Syrians in the Middle East are at war,  how come so many babies are born without regard as to how they will be cared for or kept safe during the war?

One Syrian man lamented the drowning of his wife and seven children on the way to Greece.  Several of his children would have been born during the current conflict in Syria. We saw this on TV the other day and it amazed me how this could occur.  Even if the Syrians spent time in refugee camps,  surely this was not the ideal place to bring babies into an uncertain future.

 

The appeal of the Jeep Renegade TV advertisement in Australia

I have always been fascinated by advertising and marketing because it reflects society.  By trying to capture our attention advertising informs us about ourselves in the hope that it will appeal to our wallet.

Advertising is a gamble even if it’s well researched beforehand.  It’s no secret that I like the Specsavers ad when the hunky myopic guy rescues a seal believing it to be a young child. The ad is amusing, pleasant to watch and sends the right message.  “Go to Specsavers if you’re having a problem with your sight.”  Simple, amusing and effective.

On the contrary,  the Ford ad with that prissy little bitchy lady in the blue dress has a counterproductive effect and I have not been an admirer of that ad.

I do like the Jeep Renegade commercial, however, because of its catchy music and great masculine visuals.  I’ve even found the ad on You Tube and am enjoying listening to the band, the X  Ambassadors who perform in the ad.  It’s message is simple.   The Jeep Renegade is Now.  It is  adventurous, sexy,  and promises real excitement.  Music and product go well together and make their point.

Contrast that with that stupid Ford commercial whose message is lost by poor casting and visuals and you’ll understand why some ads work while others fail.

Shark Attacks- Don’t blame the sharks.

Every couple of weeks or so someone in Australian waters gets attacked by a shark. In fact, Australia is getting the reputation for being the shark attack epicentre of our planet.

It’s always a shock and everyone becomes outraged about the attack.  Why is this happening? What shall we do about it?  Should we build a net around Australia to stop the shark attacks?

The answer is simple really. Sharks will attack us only if we are wet. They will attack us if we invade their domain and they may also attack us if they are peckish.

They will not come into your home while you are watching TV or having dinner or having a bath or whatever.

So it’s up to you to decide whether it’s worth the risk to play in the shark’s milieu. If you choose to do so don’t complain cause you’re the one doing the home invasion.

Sharks are only doing what they are programmed to do,  that is  swim,  search for food , attack,  eat and reproduce.  In a way,  we are programmed to do the same thing as the sharks  but we should stick to our own territory when we do so.

The Dressmaker–what in the world?

I have a suggestion for Peter Dutton, who is the Immigration and Border Protection Minster of Australia.  Whenever a boat carrying  “asylum seekers” is caught trying to reach our shores,  he should screen for them  “The Dressmaker”.

I guarantee that the boat people would beg the smugglers to turn the boat around and escape as far as possible from the image of Australia depicted in this film.

The setting for this Aussie production is the town of Dungatar which is made up of an extremely phony collection of sheds and outhouses.  Its inhabitants look like escapees from a Bruegel painting,  a bunch of weird caricatures.  There aren’t many of them in the town of Dungapoo but we have the village idiot, the cross-dressing policeman,  the demented mother of the dressmaker who is a hoarder,  the sex-starved fatty, the mean rich man who bosses everyone around,  all overacted by usually reputable Aussie actors.

Apparently,  the producers needed a celebrity for the title role of Tilly Dunnage who  has arrived to wreak havoc on the town that done her wrong by accusing her of murder.  So they chose Kate Winslet.  Alas, poor Kate. If only she had found a box of matches sooner and put us out of our misery long before the two hours of  “The Dressmaker.”

Francis Bacon said that  “revenge is a kind of wild justice” and boy does Tilly go wild. She outsews the opposition, cleans up her mother’s messy home,  cures her mother’s madness,  slims down The Biggest Loser by making her a new dress, finds out that the nasty man who drugs his wife and then has sex with her while she is knocked out, is actually Tilly’s father. Enough already.

In my defence, we were given these cinema tickets for free, but we overpaid!   We stayed until the apocalyptic end because I could not believe that this film which other people said I should go see was not going to improve.  Not even the town hunk who plays football can save this film.

Wouldn’t you think I would have learned my lesson by now?